DIY – Eyeglass Case Sewing Kit

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SOURCE
Sachiko has a wonderful detailed tutorial over on her blog on how to make this gorgeous sewing kit. Love that you can make a beautiful sewing kit by recycling or even buy a eyeglass case at the dollar store. Please click HERE to visit Sachiko for her full tutorial.
~ Sarah

You will need
Eyeglasse case
Fabric of your choice for outside and inside the case
Mod Podge
Sponge Brush
Ribbon to hide the hinge area
Fabric glue (or glue gun)

1. Cut fabric for the inside and outside of the case. For outer fabric, make sure that you have enough to cover the whole thing and tuck inside the case. For inner fabric, cut the edges with pinking shears to prevent fraying.

2. It is helpful to use a small dish and such to trace the curve and cut the corners.
Also, fold the fabric horizontally in the middle, cut into about an inch or so from both sides to make it easier to hold the fabric in around the hinges.

3. Spread the mod podge onto the case evenly and carefully place the fabric. Make sure there are no air bubbles. Then attach the inner fabric in the same manner too.

4. I pasted small ribbons around the hinges area to hide the “ugly” part that I couldn’t get quite right. If you don’t need it, you can skip this part.

5. Make a small pincushion. All you need to do is measure the inside of the case and decide how big you want the pincushion to be. Don’t forget to add an inch or so to the measurement, when you stuff it, the length and width will “shrink” (because it gets puffy). Glue the pincushion inside of the case.
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DIY – Ceramic Project

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Hi Ya, I have been wanting to paint over some of my ceramic plates, jugs and huge platters. I’m thinking of painting them mainly white with grey and orange accents. Perhaps using a grey and orange chevron pattern would look good on the large platters? I love orange & grey! We have received some beautiful ceramic gifts and I would love to display them. Some of our wedding presents are gorgeous but I am not in love with some of the colours on them. But I don’t want to paint them with a toxic paint and be unable to use them. I have been looking for a way to paint them and still reuse them on occasion and I think this might work I found it at Martha Stewart Living. What doesn’t Martha know? I hope you enjoy this DIY project.
~ Sarah xxx

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On its own, a dot looks very lonely indeed. But group several together and they make a striking impression. Consider, for example, the patterned wings of a ladybug or monarch butterfly. Luckily, Mother Nature doesn’t have a monopoly on making things beautiful with spots — you can do the same with ceramic or porcelain dishes, basic art supplies, and a little imagination.

Putting paint to porcelain is easier than you think. Uncomplicated designs can be done freehand; for others, use our templates or create your own. You’ll trace the shapes using transfer paper and a ballpoint pen, then cover those marks with painted dots — paint applicator makes it a cinch to do this neatly. The delightful freckles lend themselves to a variety of motifs, from organic florals to monograms to geometric patterns. If you can bear to part with them, dot-painted ceramics make wonderful gifts. Arrange the ones you keep on open shelves or behind glass cabinet doors-they are, after all, works of art. We suggest only painting across the surface of plates that are decorative, not for eating.

Tools and Materials
Baby wipes
Scissors
Red transfer paper
Clear tape
Ceramic plate or other item
Ballpoint pen
Food-safe ceramic paint (such as Porcelaine 150)
Paper muffin cups
Wooden coffee stirrers
Paint applicator bottles
Straight pin

Dot-Painting How-To
If you make a mistake, remove errant paint with a baby wipe.

1. Photocopy or print templates and enlarge or reduce as desired; cut out. Cut transfer paper slightly larger than template. Place it under template, and tape both to plate. Firmly trace template with a ballpoint pen.

2. Mix paint colors (we added white to make lighter shades), then pour into applicator bottle.

3. Practice making dots on scrap paper: Squeeze bottle gently for small dots and harder for larger ones. Make dots on traced design (use pin to unclog bottle tip as necessary). Let dry 2 hours; remove transfer lines with baby wipe. Heat in 300-degree oven for 30 minutes. To store extra paint, insert pin into bottle tip.

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DIY – Cushion Covers

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Hi Ya, Here is a reblog from the Farmers Nest. Click the above SOURCE button for her full tutorial. I am so going to find a carzillion jumpers/sweaters and make a carzillion cushions! Don’t ya just love clever people like the Farmers Nest folk!? Enjoy.
~ Sarah xxx

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PHOTO SOURCE

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How to make a tank top totes

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How clever is this idea? If you click HERE you will go directly to craftynest tutorial. They have all the instructions you will need to complete your project. Enjoy! ~ Sarah xxx

Supplies and toolse:
tank top
straight pins
water-erasable fabric marker
sewing machine and thread
fabric scissors
seam ripper
sewing gauge or ruler

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DIY – Make Your Own Notebooks

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What a great idea making your own notepads click this SOURCE to get to the clever Chica and Jo for their full tutorial. You can also recycle your old paper. Enjoy! ~ Sarah

I have recently discovered a special type of glue that you can use to make your own notepads. It’s called padding compound and it’s a simple adhesive that you apply to a stack of paper to turn it into a notepad.

We have had endless fun making custom, personalized notepads and doing various fun projects with it, and are still coming up with new ideas for more. It’s so easy to use, too! Here are the basics.

Instructions:
Take a stack of paper — any color, type, or size you want — and tap it on the table so that one side is as flat as it can be. If you want your notepad to have a sturdy back, add a piece of cardboard, cut to the same size, to the bottom of your stack. Secure the sheets together with a couple of binder clips. (You can also add a sheet of plain white paper on the top and bottom of the stack if you want to protect the notepad from glue drips, as we’ve done here.)

Now take a small brush and apply the padding compound liberally along the edge of the pad. In just a few minutes’ time, it will dry to a smooth and non-sticky finish. If you have a particularly large notepad and would like extra strength, you can also apply a second or third coat.

And just like that, you’ve made your own custom notepad!

If you’re as intrigued by this stuff as I was when I first found out about it, you’ll want to know where to get it! It seems that most places sell it by the quart or gallon, but since it takes such a tiny amount of the compound to make a notepad, that would practically be a lifetime supply, which may be a bit much for the typical crafter. Fortunately for you, we sell more reasonably-sized 2oz bottles of padding compound in our Amazon store! One bottle is enough to make dozens of notepads. (See our estimation guide to see how much coverage you can get from one bottle.)

The possibilities for these notepads are endless! Here are a few ideas I’ve tried so far:
Make a mat stack for you or for a scrapbooking friend. Simply cut a collection of scrapbook papers a little larger than an average photo print (for example, 4.5″ x 6.5″) and turn them into a pad. You can then tear off a mat one at a time, whenever you want to mat a photo in your scrapbook.
Turn scraps of paper into a cute scratch pad. What’s more fun than cute, printed paper when it comes to the scratch pad on your desk? Just take your otherwise useless scraps and pull them together into a notepad you’ll really enjoy using.

Bundle business cards into a stack. My husband is constantly scattering his business cards all over his truck and bag because they are loose and hard for him to keep together. I took a stack of them and made a notepad out of them and now he has an organized stack that’s easy to carry. His clients are always impressed and delighted when he pulls a card off the pad.

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