DIY – Photo Bunting

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I found this on PINTEREST and thought what a great idea for sharing memories for an Anniversery or a special Birthday Celebration. There wasn’t a link to a how to make it but I reckon you could use some printing canvas or thick card and print your photo on it and then make into cute photo bunting! Ages ago I bought some A4 sheets of printing canvas from Aldi and it worked very well. You will want to convert your photo into black and white, and then sharpen, and then contrast your pic and print. Or alternatively pop into a printing shop and let a professional do it for you!
~ Sarah xxx

DIY – Eyeglass Case Sewing Kit

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Sachiko has a wonderful detailed tutorial over on her blog on how to make this gorgeous sewing kit. Love that you can make a beautiful sewing kit by recycling or even buy a eyeglass case at the dollar store. Please click HERE to visit Sachiko for her full tutorial.
~ Sarah

You will need
Eyeglasse case
Fabric of your choice for outside and inside the case
Mod Podge
Sponge Brush
Ribbon to hide the hinge area
Fabric glue (or glue gun)

1. Cut fabric for the inside and outside of the case. For outer fabric, make sure that you have enough to cover the whole thing and tuck inside the case. For inner fabric, cut the edges with pinking shears to prevent fraying.

2. It is helpful to use a small dish and such to trace the curve and cut the corners.
Also, fold the fabric horizontally in the middle, cut into about an inch or so from both sides to make it easier to hold the fabric in around the hinges.

3. Spread the mod podge onto the case evenly and carefully place the fabric. Make sure there are no air bubbles. Then attach the inner fabric in the same manner too.

4. I pasted small ribbons around the hinges area to hide the “ugly” part that I couldn’t get quite right. If you don’t need it, you can skip this part.

5. Make a small pincushion. All you need to do is measure the inside of the case and decide how big you want the pincushion to be. Don’t forget to add an inch or so to the measurement, when you stuff it, the length and width will “shrink” (because it gets puffy). Glue the pincushion inside of the case.
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DIY – Ceramic Project

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Hi Ya, I have been wanting to paint over some of my ceramic plates, jugs and huge platters. I’m thinking of painting them mainly white with grey and orange accents. Perhaps using a grey and orange chevron pattern would look good on the large platters? I love orange & grey! We have received some beautiful ceramic gifts and I would love to display them. Some of our wedding presents are gorgeous but I am not in love with some of the colours on them. But I don’t want to paint them with a toxic paint and be unable to use them. I have been looking for a way to paint them and still reuse them on occasion and I think this might work I found it at Martha Stewart Living. What doesn’t Martha know? I hope you enjoy this DIY project.
~ Sarah xxx

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On its own, a dot looks very lonely indeed. But group several together and they make a striking impression. Consider, for example, the patterned wings of a ladybug or monarch butterfly. Luckily, Mother Nature doesn’t have a monopoly on making things beautiful with spots — you can do the same with ceramic or porcelain dishes, basic art supplies, and a little imagination.

Putting paint to porcelain is easier than you think. Uncomplicated designs can be done freehand; for others, use our templates or create your own. You’ll trace the shapes using transfer paper and a ballpoint pen, then cover those marks with painted dots — paint applicator makes it a cinch to do this neatly. The delightful freckles lend themselves to a variety of motifs, from organic florals to monograms to geometric patterns. If you can bear to part with them, dot-painted ceramics make wonderful gifts. Arrange the ones you keep on open shelves or behind glass cabinet doors-they are, after all, works of art. We suggest only painting across the surface of plates that are decorative, not for eating.

Tools and Materials
Baby wipes
Scissors
Red transfer paper
Clear tape
Ceramic plate or other item
Ballpoint pen
Food-safe ceramic paint (such as Porcelaine 150)
Paper muffin cups
Wooden coffee stirrers
Paint applicator bottles
Straight pin

Dot-Painting How-To
If you make a mistake, remove errant paint with a baby wipe.

1. Photocopy or print templates and enlarge or reduce as desired; cut out. Cut transfer paper slightly larger than template. Place it under template, and tape both to plate. Firmly trace template with a ballpoint pen.

2. Mix paint colors (we added white to make lighter shades), then pour into applicator bottle.

3. Practice making dots on scrap paper: Squeeze bottle gently for small dots and harder for larger ones. Make dots on traced design (use pin to unclog bottle tip as necessary). Let dry 2 hours; remove transfer lines with baby wipe. Heat in 300-degree oven for 30 minutes. To store extra paint, insert pin into bottle tip.

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DIY – Infinity Scarf

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What’s needed:
– an old t-shirt (a sweater might do as well)
– scissors
– pins
– thread in contrasting color (I used a contrasting yellowish green thread to offset the brownish/grey faded color of the T-shirt.
– sewing machine or needle

Instructions:
1. Lay down your T-shirt on a flat surface and cut off the bottom hem part. Snip-Snip. (pic.2) Do the same at the sleeve insert level, cutting from one side to the other (pic.3)
2. Fold in half and cut again along the fold – snip snip – to obtain two identically sized tunnels. (pic.4)
3. Cut away the side seams (4 times) – snip-snip – to obtain 4 identically sized rectangles. (pic.5.)
4. Lay one rectangle on top of another rectangle, right sides facing up, and with a 1/2 inch overlap. Pin together – pins-pins (which happens to be the palindrome of snip snip, by the way, how cute is that!). Repeat for the remaining pieces and close the circle by placing the first rectangle on top of the last one (pic.6).
5. Sew together by hand or on your sewing machine with a jersey stitch. And done!

You have now obtained a wonderful light weight infinity scarf and no cost. So, now you can start experimenting with it – wear it twisted around your neck a couple of times, or just once and knotted… You probably could wear it as a head band as well… or as why not, as a belt (as a maternity belt even).

I hope you enjoy this as much as I have. Simply click this SOURCE button for the Infinity Scarf Full Tutorial!

~ Sarah xxx

DIY – Vintage Spools for Photo’s

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So cute from StudioCalico. Please go there for the tutorial.

Studio Calico. The top photo’s are from Pinterest. I couldn’t find the source. I did try. I searched and searched and then gave up. So if you know the source please let me know. Thanks!
Enjoy. ~ Sarah xxx

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DIY – Stenciled Table Runner

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Gorgeousness from Pretty Handy Girl. Click the source button to go to her full tutorial! In Australia and in New Zealand often our painters drop cloths are made from canvas. Canvas would also make a fab table runner!!!
~ Sarah xxx

DIY – Clay Christmas Decorations

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These clay Christmas decorations are super cute they are from Carmen she blogs HERE please pop along to her blog for the full tutorial. I think they would look sweet hanging on a Christmas tree!
Blessings ~ Sarah xxx

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Clay Christmas Decorations

1/2 cup cornstarch
1 cup baking soda
3/4 cup water

Making Clay

In a medium sized pot combine the cornstarch, baking soda, and water. With an adults help the kids can stir this mixture over medium-low heat. After a couple of minutes, the mixture will begin to thicken. When it looks like smooth, mashed potatoes, remove the pot from the heat. Spoon the ball of dough into a bowl and cover it with a damp cloth until it’s cool. When it’s cool, knead it on a smooth surface, adding a little more cornstarch if it feels sticky.

Rolling, cutting, and baking

Preheat oven to 175 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll out clay to 1/4 inch thick on a surface lightly dusted with cornstarch. Use cookie cutters to cut out shapes. Transfer shapes to the prepared baking sheet. Use a straw to poke a hole in the center top of each decoration, then get the kids to blow out the small piece of clay. They love this task! Place them in the oven at 175 degrees for about an hour, turning them over halfway through cooking.

Paint or decorate them and thread a piece of ribbon, twine or yarn through the holes.

If you want to make colored clay just add food coloring to the water before you mix it with the cornstarch and baking soda. The clay can be sealed in an airtight container and kept in the fridge for a couple of weeks. Just bring it to room temperature before you use it. This recipe can also be doubled to make a larger batch of decorations.

DIY – Wooden Sign

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I really love words and scripture on wooden boards look lovely. The lettering is printed on the board by using a Sharpie paint pen. So clever! Homespun has an easy and fantastic tutorial HERE . I think this is super cute, I hope you like it too.
Blessings ~ Sarah xxx

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